Complete List of Musical Instruments That Start with E

In this article we will provide a complete list of musical instruments that start with E. This list is comprehensive and diverse, covering instruments from various cultures and time periods. Keep in mind that some of the spellings may vary due to language differences, and some of the origins may be geopolitically debated. Before we dive into the complete list. Lets look at the 5 most common for those who want a quick rundown. Later we will provide over 100 examples of instruments that start with the letter E.

Most Common Instruments that Start with E

Based on our research, here are the 5 most common musical instruments starting with the letter E. We will give some background on each instrument as well as provide some examples of music featuring these wonderful instruments.

English Horn

A double-reed woodwind instrument that is part of the oboe family. Slightly larger than the oboe, it has a lower pitch and a more distinct, mellower sound. Used in orchestras and chamber music, the English horn is often featured in solos and is known for its expressive and melancholic tone.

A famous piece of music featuring the English horn is the solo in the second movement of Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9, “From the New World”, you can hear it in the video below. Mozart also used the English horn in his Symphony No. 22 in C major (K. 162). Other prominent composers who wrote for the English horn include Ravel, Debussy, and Richard Strauss. Notable English horn players include Thomas Stacy, former principal English horn of the New York Philharmonic, and Washington Barella, a renowned soloist and orchestral musician.

Euphonium

A brass instrument with a conical bore, similar to a tuba but with a higher pitch. Played using valves and widely used in concert bands, brass ensembles, and marching bands, the euphonium is known for its rich, dark tone and its ability to blend well with other brass instruments.

Renowned euphonium players include Steven Mead, a British virtuoso, and David Childs, a Welsh soloist who has performed with many major orchestras. The euphonium is often featured in wind band compositions, such as Philip Sparke’s “Pantomime” and Joseph Horovitz’s “Euphonium Concerto”. You can hear the instrument and see how it looks below.

Erhu

A Chinese bowed string instrument with two strings, often used in traditional Chinese music and modern Chinese orchestras. The erhu has a distinctive sound, somewhat similar to a violin but with a more nasal and emotive quality. Its versatility makes it suitable for both solo performances and as an accompaniment instrument.

One of the most famous erhu pieces is “The Moon Reflected on Erquan Pool” by Hua Yanjun. Renowned erhu players include Liu Tianhua, a Chinese composer and performer, and George Gao, an international erhu soloist and composer. You can hear the master erhu player Wang Guowei performing “The Moon Reflected on Erquan Pool” in this wonderful video.

Esraj

The Esraj is an Indian bowed string instrument, similar to the dilruba but smaller, used in traditional Indian classical music, particularly in the Hindustani tradition. The esraj typically has 20 strings, including four main playing strings and numerous sympathetic strings that resonate as the main strings are played.

The instrument is played with a bow, and its haunting, resonant sound is well-suited for slow, introspective melodies and accompaniment. The esraj reminds us of a more mellow sitar, its truly very beautiful. Pandit Ranadhir Ray was a prominent esraj player, and his performances of ragas are emotionally moving. Here is a video showcasing both the esraj and Pandit’s ethereal playing.

Ektara

A traditional Indian single-stringed instrument used in various forms of Indian music, particularly folk and devotional songs. The ektara features a simple construction with a wooden or bamboo frame, a single string, and a gourd or coconut shell resonator. The string is plucked with one hand while the other hand controls the tension to create different pitches. Its simplicity and portability make it a popular choice for wandering musicians and storytellers.

Ektara is often associated with the Bauls, a group of mystic minstrels from Bengal, who use it as a primary instrument in their performances. Famous Baul musicians like Lalon Fakir and Purna Das Baul have used the ektara to accompany their songs, which often convey spiritual and philosophical messages. Contemporary artists like Parvathy Baul are still showcasing this interesting instrument in their music. Check out this piece, ‘Kichhu Din Mone Mone’, where Parvathy uses an ektara.

Complete List of Musical Instruments that Start with E

This brings us to our complete list of musical instruments that start with the letter E. We have, of course, included the 5 we discussed above, for completion sake. This list is alphabetical and gives a short description of each instrument.

Ebang – An Indonesian xylophone traditionally made from bamboo or metal bars.

Eboshi – A Japanese wooden percussion instrument resembling a hat, struck with sticks or hands.

Eburu – A Nigerian string instrument similar to a lyre, played with a bow or by plucking.

Echalette – A French keyboard instrument from the 18th century, similar to a clavichord but with a unique string arrangement.

Echo cornet – A brass instrument resembling a cornet but featuring a secondary bell to create an echo effect.

Eclaró – A traditional Spanish clarinet, characterized by a unique reed and mouthpiece design.

Ecorcheur – A medieval French percussion instrument, consisting of a wooden frame with several metal discs or jingles.

Ectara – A Bengali one-stringed instrument, often used as a drone in traditional music.

Edapu – An Indian percussion instrument, typically made from clay or metal and played with sticks or hands.

Eddigi – An ancient Greek wind instrument, similar to a pan flute or syrinx.

Eddophone – A German electric string instrument from the early 20th century, using electromagnetic pickups to amplify sound.

Eder – A Hungarian wind instrument, similar to a recorder or flute, often made from wood or bone.

Edo-uchiwa-daiko – A Japanese drum resembling a fan, played with a single drumstick.

Egede – A Nigerian string instrument, similar to a kora or harp, featuring a gourd resonator and a wooden neck with multiple strings.

Egeke – A Cameroonian percussion instrument, usually made from a hollowed-out log or wooden frame with stretched animal skin.

Egibi – A Nigerian drum, traditionally made from clay or wood and played with hands or sticks.

Egungun – A Nigerian drum, used in traditional Yoruba ceremonies and rituals, often played with a curved stick.

Ei – A Chinese drum, typically cylindrical and made from wood or metal, played with mallets or hands.

Eichklang – A Swiss lithophone, consisting of tuned stone slabs or bars, played by striking with mallets.

Eiren – An ancient Greek wind instrument, made from an animal horn and played by buzzing the lips.

Eirlinach – An ancient Irish string instrument, similar to a harp or lyre, played with a plectrum or fingers.

Eisa Drum – An Okinawan hand drum, used in traditional Eisa dance performances and played with a single stick.

Ekambi – A Cameroonian percussion instrument, made from a hollowed-out gourd or calabash and filled with seeds or beads.

Ekang – A Cameroonian drum, typically made from wood and animal skin, played with hands or sticks.

Ekele – An African percussion instrument, often made from a gourd or calabash and played by shaking or striking.

Ekese – A Nigerian percussion instrument, similar to a tambourine, featuring a wooden frame with metal jingles.

Ekett – A Nigerian drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with a curved stick or the hands.

Ekgpo – A Nigerian percussion instrument, usually made from a hollowed-out log or wooden frame with stretched animal skin.

Ekibondo – An Ugandan drum, characterized by a tall, cylindrical shape and played with hands or sticks.

Ekifundu – An Ugandan drum, typically made from wood and animal skin, played with hands or sticks.

Ekimolo – A Nigerian drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with a curved stick or the hands.

Ekire – A Nigerian drum, traditionally made from clay or wood and played with hands or sticks.

Ekitundu – An Ugandan drum, characterized by a tall, cylindrical shape and played with hands or sticks.

Ekoka – A Nigerian percussion instrument, usually made from a hollowed-out log or wooden frame with stretched animal skin.

Ekor – A Nigerian drum, traditionally made from clay or wood and played with hands or sticks.

Ekrak – A Nigerian drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with a curved stick or the hands.

Ekru – An African string instrument, similar to a lyre or harp, featuring a gourd resonator and a wooden neck with multiple strings.

Ektara – An Indian single-stringed instrument, often used as a drone in traditional music and played by plucking.

Eku – A Nigerian drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with a curved stick or the hands.

Ekwe – An Igbo wooden slit drum, carved from a single log and played by striking with sticks.

Ela Tarang – An Indian electronic Jal Tarang, which uses water-filled bowls to produce sound and is played with mallets.

Elafiaji – A Nigerian drum, traditionally made from clay or wood and played with hands or sticks.

Elebba – A Nigerian drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with a curved stick or the hands.

Electro-Theremin – An electronic musical instrument that produces a theremin-like sound, played by moving the hands near antennas.

Electronic Wind Instrument (EWI) – A wind controller that can produce a variety of synthesized sounds, played by blowing into a mouthpiece and pressing keys.

Eléje – A Nigerian double-headed drum, made from wood and animal skin, played with hands or sticks.

Eleke – An African percussion instrument, often made from a gourd or calabash and played by shaking or striking.

Elektravox – An electronic accordion, combining traditional accordion sounds with digital capabilities.

Elektro-Apparat – A Russian electronic instrument, using early electronic technology to produce unique sounds.

Elektrotheremin – An electronic theremin-like instrument, played by moving the hands near antennas to control pitch.

Elettromonofono – An Italian electronic instrument, designed to produce synthesized sounds and played using a keyboard or other controllers.

Eljenfono – A Hungarian string instrument, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow or by plucking.

Elondi – An African percussion instrument, often made from a gourd or calabash and played by shaking or striking.

Elymas – An ancient Mesopotamian string instrument, similar to a lyre or harp, played by plucking or strumming the strings.

Embilta – An Ethiopian flute, typically made from bamboo or other reeds, played by blowing air across the edge of the instrument.

Emene – A Nigerian drum, traditionally made from clay or wood and played with hands or sticks.

Emirtüm – A Turkish percussion instrument, often made from metal or wood and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Emo – A Japanese percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Empu – A Javanese drum, characterized by a tall, cylindrical shape and played with hands or sticks.

Empulu – An Indonesian percussion instrument, usually made from a hollowed-out log or wooden frame with stretched animal skin.

Endaro – An Indonesian string instrument, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow or by plucking.

Endere – An Ethiopian flute, typically made from bamboo or other reeds, played by blowing air across the edge of the instrument.

Endongo – An Ugandan lyre, featuring a wooden frame with multiple strings and a gourd resonator, played by plucking or strumming the strings.

Engalabi – An Ugandan drum, characterized by a tall, cylindrical shape and played with hands or sticks.

English Horn – A woodwind instrument, similar to an oboe but larger and with a lower pitch, played using a double reed.

Engundu – A Congolese drum, typically made from wood and animal skin, played with hands or sticks.

Enharmonic Organ – A type of pipe organ that incorporates microtonal tuning, allowing for a wider range of pitches than a standard organ.

Enko – A Japanese percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Ennanga – An Ugandan harp, featuring a wooden frame with multiple strings and a gourd resonator, played by plucking or strumming the strings.

Enpon – A Japanese percussion instrument, usually made from a hollowed-out log or wooden frame with stretched animal skin.

Entumbane – A Zimbabwean mbira, featuring a wooden frame with metal tines that are plucked with the thumbs.

Enxaneta – A Catalan wind instrument, similar to a recorder or flute, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Epigonion – An ancient Greek string instrument, similar to a harp or lyre, featuring a wooden frame with multiple strings.

Epirus klarino – A Greek clarinet, similar to a standard clarinet but with a unique regional tuning and playing style.

Erbano – A Colombian percussion instrument, often made from metal or wood and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Erhu – A Chinese bowed string instrument, featuring a long neck with two strings and a hexagonal or octagonal resonator, played with a bow.

Erkencho – An Argentinian wind instrument, similar to a small clarinet or oboe, made from cane and played using a single reed.

Erkete – A Mongolian percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Erklemez – A Turkish string instrument, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow or by plucking.

Ermay – An Armenian percussion instrument, often made from metal or wood and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Ermine – A Russian string instrument, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow or by plucking.

Erndili – An Albanian woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Erxian – A Chinese bowed string instrument, featuring a long neck with two strings and a resonator, played with a bow.

Erzincan kemence – A Turkish string instrument, similar to a fiddle, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow.

Esashi oiwake – A Japanese woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Escalitra – A Spanish percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Esnaw – A Moroccan percussion instrument, often made from metal or wood and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Esraj – An Indian bowed string instrument, featuring a wooden body with multiple strings and sympathetic strings, played with a bow.

Estey Organ – A reed organ made by the Estey Organ Company, featuring a keyboard and foot-operated bellows to produce sound.

Estey reed organ – An American keyboard instrument, similar to a harmonium, featuring a keyboard and foot-operated bellows to produce sound.

Estudiantina – A Spanish string instrument, featuring a wooden body and a number of strings, played with a bow or by plucking.

Esztertár – A Hungarian percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Etaka – A Japanese woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Etenraku – A Japanese woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Etrill – A French percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Euben – An ancient Greek woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Euchee – A Native American woodwind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Eudicaulis – An ancient Greek string instrument, similar to a lyre or harp, featuring a wooden frame with multiple strings.

Eudora – An ancient Greek percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Eungtong – A Korean bamboo flute, featuring a long, thin body with finger holes, played by blowing air into the instrument.

Euphonia – A 19th-century keyboard instrument, often incorporating a reed

Euphonica – A type of harmonium, a keyboard instrument that uses a foot-operated bellows to produce sound, often used in classical and devotional music.

Euphonium – A brass instrument with a conical bore, similar to a tuba but with a higher pitch, played using valves and widely used in concert bands and brass ensembles.

Euphonon – An American keyboard instrument, featuring a keyboard and a unique mechanism to produce sound, often used in classical and popular music.

Euphony – A French percussion instrument, typically made from wood or metal and played by striking with sticks or hands.

Eurythmy – A movement-based instrument that uses body movements to create or interpret music, often performed in groups and associated with anthroposophy.

Euterpistra – An ancient Greek string instrument, similar to a lyre or harp, featuring a wooden frame with multiple strings.

Ewhistle – An electronic wind instrument that mimics the sound and playing technique of traditional wind instruments, often used in modern and experimental music.

Ewi – A Yoruba wind instrument, similar to a flute or recorder, played by blowing air into the instrument and covering finger holes.

Exoskeleton – An experimental percussion instrument, typically made from metal or other materials and played by striking with sticks or hands, often used in avant-garde music.

instruments that start with the letter e

This is as concise of a list of instruments starting with E we could compile, based on our extensive research. However, it is important to note that new instruments are invented and discovered over time, so it’s possible that there are more instruments out there that are not included in this list. We hope you found this article helpful. Thank you for reading!

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